Rani jinda kaur

The most remarkable women in sikh history was the youngest wife of Maharaja Ranjit Singh. Maharani Jind Kaur has a facinating personality. She was the queen mother of the last sikh sovereign Maharaja Duleep Singh and is called queen mother by the various European writers as well as contemparory writers.Of all the wives of Maharaja Ranjeet Singh, only Rani Jindan was destined to play important role in Sikh history.

Maharani Jind Kaur popularly known as Jindan, was a wife of Maharaja Ranjit Singh and mother of Maharaja Duleep Singh, the last sikh sovereign of the Punjab. She was born to Mataji Kaur and Manna Singh in 1817 , who was a Aulakh of jatt Gujranwala, who held an humble position at the court as an overseer of the royal kennels. She was renowed for her beauty, energy and strength of pupose but her frame is derived chiefly from the fear she endangered in the british in India, who described her as the ” the Messalina of the Punjab”, a seductress too rebellious to be controlled.

Sardar Manna Singh who was a father of Rani Jinda Kaur who was a Aulakh jatt who hailed from a small village Chachar, district Gujarnwala, Pakistan, now in west pakistan. Aulakh jatt or Aurak , jatt tribe, whose headquaters mainly situated in Amritsar district .

They owened twelve villiages; they were also found in northern malwa; territory in south of Satluj. They were said to be of solar descent, and their ancestor Aulakh lived somewhere in the majha territory viz. A territory between Beas and Ravi. Alongwith the northeren malwa, the Aulakhs were also found in majha . But another story makes their ancestor one raja Lui Lak , a lunner rajput. They were related to the Sidhu and Deo tribe with whom they did not inter marry.

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